Exploring the Universe: A Laboratory Guide for Astronomy

By Mike D. Reynolds, Michael E. Bakich  •  
 2015  
•  464
 Pages
Loose-Leaf
Format • 
Print ISBN  9781617312120
• eBook ISBN  9781617314100
Suggested Student Retail Price

$59.95

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This book is customizable for courses with annual enrollments of 50 students or more.

Astronomy is a fun and challenging science for students. This manual is intended for one- and two-semester astronomy courses and uses hands-on, engaging activities to get students looking at the sky and developing a lifelong interest in astronomy. Order your review copy today!

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Features
Table of Contents
Features
  • Objectives set learning goals to prepare students for what they are expected to know after completing the lab and also aid in the review of material.
  • Looking Up elements provide students with information about important figures in astronomy and their contributions. Other fun facts are also provided to capture students’ interests.
  • Glossary terms listed in boxes in the margins of the text give students an easy reference.
  • Outdoor observational labs require that students look up at the sky with the naked eye, binoculars, or a telescope. This book is intended to build interest and get students excited about astronomy. Students are encouraged to explore, observe, analyze, and record their findings.
  • Sketch areas are provided for students to draw their observations and label their findings.
  • Caution boxes are posted where applicable to make students aware of potential risks when performing certain activities.
  • An extensive, full-color art and photography program includes hundreds of labeled diagrams, star charts, and procedural images to ensure that students have accurate visual representations of what they will see in the lab.
  • Traditional labs require students to calculate, analyze, and master difficult concepts such as Kepler’s laws, geometrical optics, and spectroscopy.
  • Observational tables ask students to record their observations in a meaningful format.
  • Check Your Understanding exercises conclude each introductory section and ask thought-provoking questions in order to measure student progress throughout the chapter.
  • Note boxes help students understand the details of the procedures.
  • Star maps give students a visual representation of the night sky and what they should see when they conduct their observations.
  • Data Sheets are provided for students to record required information for each lab activity. These sheets are intended to be submitted upon completion of the lab activity.
Table of contents
Chapter 1: Eyes
Exercise 1.1: Visual Perception Activities
Objectives and Introductory Material
Exercise 1.2: Visual Acuity Tests
Chapter 2: Geometrical Optics
Objectives and Introductory Material
Exercise 2.1: Mathematics of Geometrical Optics
Exercise 2.2: Lens and Mirror Images
Exercise 2.3: Optical Bench
Chapter 3: Binoculars
Objectives and Introductory Material
Exercise 3.1: Comparison of Binoculars
Exercise 3.2: Estimating Field of View in the Classroom
Chapter 4: Telescopes
Objectives and Introductory Material
Exercise 4.1: Getting Familiar with your Telescope
Exercise 4.2: Lunar Observations
Exercise 4.3: Constructing a Simple Telescope
Chapter 5: Star Maps
Objectives and Introductory Material
Exercise 5.1: Using a Star Chart
Exercise 5.2: Using Atlas of the Stars Charts
Chapter 6: This Season's Sky
Exercise 6.1: The Autumn Sky
Objectives and Introductory Material
Exercise 6.2: The Winter Sky
Exercise 6.3: The Spring Sky
Exercise 6.4: The Summer Sky
Chapter 7: Outdoor Sky Observations
Objectives and Introductory Material
Exercise 7.1: January-February: A Hero for the Ages
Exercise 7.2: March-April: Visit the Charioteer
Exercise 7.3: May-June: The Big Dipper
Exercise 7.4: July-August: A Tail's Tale
Exercise 7.5: September-October: Sturm the Harp
Exercise 7.6: November-December: In the Queen's Court
Chapter 8: Sketching Techniques
Objectives and Introductory Material
Exercise 8.1: Sketching Asterisms
Chapter 9: Magnitude System and Light Pollution
Objectives and Introductory Material
Exercise 9.1: Star Brightness Comparison
Exercise 9.2: Limiting Magnitude Evaluation
Exercise 9.3: Constellation Sketching With Light Pollution
Chapter 10: The Moon
Objectives and Introductory Material
Exercise 10.1: Lunar Calculations
Exercise 10.2: Craters of the Moon
Exercise 10.3: Unaided Viewing of the Moon
Exercise 10.4: Telescopic Viewing of the Moon
Chapter 11: The Sun
Objectives and Introductory Material
Exercise 11.1: Tracking the Sun Daily
Exercise 11.2: Estimating the Sun's Maximum Altitude
Exercise 11.3: Determining the Length of the Solar Day
Exercise 11.4: Classifying Sunspots
Chapter 12: Physical Features
Objectives and Introductory Material
Exercise 12.1: Comparative Planetology
Exercise 12.2: Simulating Planetary Atmospheres
Exercise 12.3: In-Lab Planet Sketching
Chapter 13: Kepler's Laws of Motion
Objectives and Introductory Material
Exercise 13.1: Applying Kepler's Laws
Chapter 14: Observing the Planets
Objectives and Introductory Material
Exercise 14.1: Observing Planetary Characteristics
Exercise 14.2: Observing Planetary Motions
Exercise 14.3: Spotlight on Jupiter
Chapter 15: Minor Bodies
Objectives and Introductory Material
Exercise 15.1: Making a Comet Model
Exercise 15.2: Comet Observing and Imaging
Exercise 15.3: Comparing Asteroids
Exercise 15.4: Asteroid Observing and Imaging
Chapter 16: Meteorites
Objectives and Introductory Material
Exercise 16.1: Meteorite Sample Study
Exercise 16.2: Finding the Radiant of the Leonid Meteor Shower
Chapter 17: Transits and Eclipses
Objectives and Introductory Material
Exercise 17.1: Calculating Distances Using Transits
Exercise 17.2: Observing a Lunar Eclipse
Chapter 18: Stars
Objectives and Introductory Material
Exercise 18.1: Observing Double Stars
Exercise 18.2: Observing Variable Stars
Exercise 18.3: Creating a Light Curve for Algol
Chapter 19: Non-Stellar Objects
Objectives and Introductory Material
Exercise 19.1: Classifying Galaxies
Exercise 19.2: Classifying Planetary Nebulae
Chapter 20: Spectroscopy
Objectives and Introductory Material
Exercise 20.1: Exploring Spectra
Exercise 20.2: Stellar Spectra Classification
Chapter 21: The H-R Diagram
Objectives and Introductory Material
Exercise 21.1: Plotting Stars
Chapter 22: Radioactivity
Objectives and Introductory Material
Exercise 22.1: Measuring Radioactivity
Chapter 23: Hubble's Law
Objectives and Introductory Material
Exercise 23.1: The Expanding Universe
Exercise 23.2: Determining Galactic Distances
Appendix - Locations of Major Telescopes
Photo Credits
Index
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